Download Episode Here right click link and select “Save Link As…”

PHQ | QUESTIONS FROM COMMUNITY: In this episode Joel and Antonia answer a question about trauma and personality tests.

 

To subscribe to the podcast, please use the links below:

Subscribe with iTunes
Non iTunes Link
Download The Android App
Subscribe on Soundcloud
Subscribe with Stitcher

If you like the podcast and want to help us out in return, please leave an honest rating and review on iTunes by clicking here. It will help the show and its ranking in iTunes immensely! We would be eternally grateful!

Want to learn more?

Discover Your Personal Genius

free-personality-test-myers-briggs-2

We want to hear from you. Leave your comments below…

Showing 17 comments
  • Jian Wei Gan Lim
    Reply

    I’ve been bouncing back and forth as to whether I’m an INTJ or an INTP, and while your last article provided clarity on certain characteristics of both, I’d say I only resonated slightly more with INTJ, and even then, the margin of error for my estimations likely made that slight edge meaningless.

    That said, what you mentioned in this podcast did give me a bit of a chuckle, because it brought my attention to a year ago where I was incredibly stressed, and was tested as an ISFP.

    Given that the functions are slightly in reverse to that of an INTJ’s, it did amuse me when the idea of stressful situations creating an emphasis with the tertiary and inferior functions was brought up.

    I’m not any more clear on whether I’m an INTJ or an INTP, but I thought the incident was amusing enough to mention.

    • Joel Mark Witt
      Reply

      Thanks for mentioning it Jian. And thanks for continuing to read and tune in.

      It may take some time and work on your side to finally figure out your type. There is no hurry and we will keep publishing media and articles that should help you on this personal journey of discovery.

      Stay tuned…

  • Heather Blackwell
    Reply

    Religion is an institution that causes one’s personality type to deviate. I know this from personal experience. In the past, I tested that I “appreciate tradition”, but then I realized that I don’t appreciate tradition. For example, I don’t respect the contractual concept of marriage as the preferred expression of commitment, but I was brainwashed to believe that anything other than the contract of marriage was sinful. That is just one example of how religion challenged my intrinsic and “hard-wired” beliefs causing me to appear as an INFJ rather than an INTP. I hope this helps you in your book writing or podcasting endeavors.

    • Antonia Dodge
      Reply

      I’d agree – our programming and ‘outsourced’ values will sometimes skew our results. When we calibrate to our own authenticity and core values we generally have an easier time of finding our Best-Fit Type.

      Thanks for the comment!

      -A-

  • Heather Blackwell
    Reply

    All people have more than one personality type.

    • Antonia Dodge
      Reply

      I’d agree and disagree. Ultimately, when one has reached the highest stages of transcendence, we have no personality type. Our egos simply manifest different forms of identity.

      That said, at the stage we’re generally addressing on this site it’s extremely valuable to find your Best-Fit Type, the single Myers-Briggs type that matches how your brain is wired when you are at your healthiest to promote continued health and focus on high leverage exercises to match that wiring.

      If you mean we can manifest different types depending upon our level of development, I’d still argue that we are a single type calling upon different cognitive functions in our stack (or, the car model passengers, as we refer to them) strategically. We don’t ‘change’ type, but rather manifest different aspects of that type.

      -A-

  • Heather Blackwell
    Reply

    What you’re referring to as various stages of thinking processes I refer to in terms of Eric Berne’s ego states. For each of your thinking processes, I use a child, adult, and parent ego state. For example, my child ego state is INFP. My adult ego state is INTP. My parent ego state is INF J. My child ego state is what I came packaged with. My parents ego state is the resulting influence of my authority figures (e.g. parents, pastor). My adult ego state is my ability to use logic and reason.

  • Antonia Dodge
    Reply

    As mentioned in the podcast, there are multiple systems for understanding personality and when it comes to the type of trauma you’re referring to, another typology system may be contextually better for understanding the self than Myers-Briggs.

    My preference when dealing with trauma (and healing) is the Enneagram system, which has written into the system multiple stages of each type at healthy, average and unhealthy levels.

    If a person really wants to use Myers-Briggs, then it’s important to remember that we’ll be relying on different cognitive functions within our stack (or, in our terminology, the difference passengers in the car model) to deal with situations that are difficult or temporarily impossible to process at our ‘best selves’.

    For example, an INFJ who is attempting to protect themselves may frequently go to their tertiary (or “10 Yr Old”) process to find a space that is cold and removed. That would be a thinking process – technically called Introverted Thinking, but what we refer to as “Accuracy” – and so they may artificially ‘show up’ and test as, say, an INTP in those times.

    Thanks for the comment!

    -A-

    • Antonia Dodge
      Reply

      Seven years – that’s terrible! Thanks for bringing awareness to the topic.

      -A-

  • Anita
    Reply

    This is a great podcast that addresses my own questions about trauma and type. I’ve been driving myself crazy trying to figure out my MBTI but my Enneagram type always remains pretty much the same. Can they be correlated (I’ve seen some try to do this on-line)and how do you see them interrelating in real time? Thanks.

    • Joel Mark Witt
      Reply

      Thanks for the question and feedback Anita. We would love to see an elegant correlation between the Enneagram and Myers-Briggs.

      Not sure we have found a direct correlation yet… but that doesn’t mean there isn’t one.

      Please help the whole Personality Hacker community by keeping your eyes open and letting us all know if you find something that truly resonates with you and seems to make sense.

  • Adrianna
    Reply

    This was an interesting podcast for me. Last year when I stumbled onto Myers-Briggs my parents were in the middle of their divorce. While I wasn’t depressed, I would say I didn’t feel great about myself. I tested out as an INFJ, and it fit (mostly) for about a year.
    The beginning of this year, I started to feel inauthentic, like that personality type was missing it’s mark. For instance, I am very awkward in social interactions, I have (on occasion) offended someone unknowingly, and even though I can be aware of the emotions for people close to me, I wouldn’t say that I “absorb” them. So, I looked at other possible types, looking at both type descriptions and how the cognitive functions come into play (because, let’s face it, there are a few descriptions that can paint certain types in a negative light).
    After all of this research, it seems like the INTJ fits me the best. My “Aha” moment was actually when I read the INTJ article on this website and I read that INTJs can actually be very vulnerable and sensitive (that was the main reason why I thought I was an INFJ, was because of that sensitivity).
    This podcast really helped confirm this, honestly, I would hate to be wrong twice in a row. Thank you for making this podcast, I look forward to more in the future.

    • Charis Branson
      Reply

      Thanks for the feedback Adrianna! We like to hear people are growing and refining their best-fit type. It’s not the end of the world if you get it wrong once or twice. To me, it indicates you are getting to know yourself on a more profound level – which is good!

  • James
    Reply

    I can totally relate to the person who asked that question. I tend to test as any of the four IN types, and I’m not sure what’s what; what is really me, and what is just trauma, or a response to external pressures. The fact that most of the type aware people I talk to have different typings (a couple INTJ, and a couple INTP, even though I personally don’t relate to Te or lead Ti) just confuses matters even more. :/

    At this point, I just want an answer for the sake of not having to worry about it anymore.

  • Mae
    Reply

    Hello. Thsnk you for your podcasts. I’ve been searching around and soing research and want to get uour opinion on my attempt at aelf-typing. I keep testing entp enfp infp infj intj in function tests. As a result of experiences I’ve forced myself to mimic fe or focus on others to distract myself from my own vulnerability. I like introspectuonrbit find it not in my best interest to spend too much time on it, though if logic fails, I fall back on values I’ve learned and made personal. I-m clumsy with people and feelibgs but have learned to overcone it and show concern with day to day observation and mimicry. I’ve mostly worn a protective nice girl mask and learned small talk as a barrier. I’m physically clumsy and was hyper as a child. Social anxiety characterizes my interactions with people. Formerly into fiction as a child, but not so mucg anymore as a young adult. I was wodering if Ive just spent most of my life indulging my feeling function. Or authenticity os dominant but ive learned to hold it back with thinkibg. Ive been lookibg into unhealthy forms of different types as well. I know that my weaker functions are si and fe. Perspectives is still a bit confusing for me. Despite all the research I still haven’t an even mildly satisfying conclusion. I know you receive lots of tuping questions. I hope you don’t mind another. Thank you for your effort.

  • Drak
    Reply

    Can extreme trauma at young cause your mental wiring to change? I read about neuro-plasticity which suggest it could but I’m not too certain about that. I’ve heard of a person who may have switched personality type during childhood from a feeling type to a thinking type. That person now demonstrates most of the attributes and has the same kind of mental wiring of a thinker ever since then. The person even seems like a healthy thinker yet has vague memories of being different, or thinking differently.

Leave a Comment