Download Episode Here – right click link and select “Save Link As…”

In this episode Joel and Antonia reject the idea of a work life balance and suggest an alternative way to see work and life.

In this podcast on the work life balance you’ll find:

  • The structure of civilization supported work life balance in the past especially in the Industrial age. There was a clear definition between things to do at work versus things to do at home. There used to be a definite time to do work related activities and a definite time to spend with loved ones at home thus making work life balance easier to attain during that time.
  • We are currently in an over communicated time wherein we are so much tethered to communication devices and technology that keep us connected to the world. These allow us to stay on top of things but in turn create a very demanding intensity of workload making it a great challenge and somehow a confusion to have work life balance nowadays.
  • Work life balance applies to a structure where there is a need to close one’s self from certain environment and situations. This kind of compartmentalization may appeal to some people but it is now becoming a trend for companies to provide their employees work which allows them some freedom from it.
  • Since everything is becoming integrated nowadays, work life balance seems to be a non workable ideal. Instead of work life balance, consider work life integration.
  • Integration is better than separation. Instead of compartmentalizing things which is done in work life balance, integration of important components of life allows us to take more control of our increasing workloads.
  • Full engagement, full focus and doing things one at a time are some of the ways to integrate components of work and life.
  • Overestimating things that we can do is overwhelming and very idealistic that it becomes impossible to attain goals.
  • There is an existing belief in society that there is something wrong in achieving things without struggle. Deprogramming ourselves from that belief and instead creating personal development goals that incorporate all components of work and life allows us to experience pleasure along the way making such goals so much easier to attain.
  • Personality hacker is fundamentally about being part of your own personal growth and development journey.
  • Know whether Work life balance or Work life integration best works for you.

 

To subscribe to the podcast, please use the links below:

Subscribe with iTunes
Non iTunes Link
Download The Android App
Subscribe on Soundcloud
Subscribe with Stitcher

If you like the podcast and want to help us out in return, please leave an honest rating and review on iTunes by clicking here. It will help the show and its ranking in iTunes immensely! We would be eternally grateful!

 

Want to learn more?

Discover Your Personal Genius

free-personality-test-myers-briggs-2

We want to hear from you. Leave your comments below…

Showing 0 comments
  • Leon
    Reply

    “If you are in a job that does not even allow you to make personal phone calls, you are probably not super-happy there. Those kinds of corporations that make those sorts of prohibitions on people’s lifestyle are going the way of to dodo.” Love it! I actually want to be a sort of boss one day, which is weird since I’m an INFP, who will provide employees the best and happiest environment ever.

    To answer your questions:
    1. I don’t do New Year’s Resolutions. Instead, I make 2-3 resolutions every month. They are simple, basic, and concrete. This way it is easier to track progress.
    2. I follow Taoism. People have this mistaken notion Taoism is about being laid back and directionless, but actually it is about balance of energies. It is about having a good, relaxed time, yet knowing when to push forward diligently too. There is an instinctive knowing inside that always presently provides direction in life, and deep inside you know when there is too much of one thing or too little of another, what opportunities to take or not to take. So you are right, focus on one thing at a time, because the Tao is presently only focused on one thing at a time.
    3. I disagree that online communication necessarily gets in the way of real relationships. The world is constantly changing, and the goal would be how to live an authentic life regardless. It is about using technology as a resource not a hindrance. People are so focused on the external condition (too much technology suppressing my real world connections, too many options is ruining life). If anything, you can use technology to easily schedule real world events with people, easily get people together (Meetup.com, Facebook groups and event planning), while continue deep conversations online when you cannot meet face-to-face. People say there are too many options. Do I eat Indian food or Chinese food? They let this dilemma make them miserable, especially if they go to the Indian restaurant but then think I should have been to the Chinese restaurant. Then they blame it on the external condition of having options: they come to the conclusion tribal life is better, since they eat grubs every day of their life and so they are happy without so many options. Options are good, and diversity shakes up trenchant narrow-minded conceptions of life. The real problem is a weak subjective factor, not the nature of the external condition–that is, being able to subjectively appreciate the Indian food at the present, even though you know that other great options are available. Certainly that is better than eating grubs.
    3. I am going to give a TEDx talk on Western and Eastern notions of creativity. The Western notion is what leads to this illusion that new & more is necessarily better (more external manifestations of creativity, the better). Ancient Eastern idea of creativity actually has nothing to do with “novelty” at all, but rather the subjective pleasurable experience (as I mentioned in point #2) of creative activity. Neither is better than the other, but it is rather about balance.
    4. To address #2 again, I actually think changing external conditions (like making a better work environment) is important. What I mean is that external change and internal change need to be balanced. Some people rely too much on the external condition to determine their happiness, others rely too exclusively on internal willpower.

    • Joel Mark Witt
      Reply

      Leon,

      Thanks for the feedback and comments. I think you have some really great points…

      1) Love the idea of doing resolutions each month. I think this idea keeps it fresh and on top of mind. It probably makes it more realistic. I have a tendency to think I can accomplish more than is reasonable in a year… but a month… I’d have to be more tangible and practical.

      2) Like the idea of Taoism and would love to get some direction on starting to study it. Any books you can recommend to get started?

      3) Are you proposing that we practice CONTENTMENT in any circumstance? I think that is an excellent way to see it.

      3b) When you get the video of your TEDx talk – share it with us on our Facebook page and we’ll share it with all of our social networks like Twitter, Facebook, etc.

      Thanks again for being apart of the Personality Hacker community Leon. Glad you are here.

      • Leon
        Reply

        You are right about the resolutions, even at a month-to-month basis, to keep it in the form of an idea–and week by week you strategise concretely how to manifest the idea. There are exceptions to this, like “no fast food” as a month’s resolution should just stand by itself.

        The Tao Te Ching is always a classic. There is the I Ching, but that is opaque (I still use it for divination). The real teacher is life–watch paradoxes happen everywhere, watch the opposites support one another, watch how pushing too far one way lands you right in its opposite. It is eerie, and perhaps is a law of the universe.

        I do not like the “maximizer” versus “satisfier” mindset. I think we should focus on increasing quality of our own lives and embrace different options in life (opposed to the satisfier mindset). You increase quality of life, but you are always content with wherever the dice falls. So yes, I agree with contentment, but this word often gets conflated with the “satisfier” mindset. The Bhagavad Gita’s “mode of goodness” is something to look into–you work in a flow state, immersed in what you do, disregard success yet still work hard, yet you are content. It is compared metaphorically to the experience of eating an apple. The “mode of passion” corresponds with the maximizer mindset–the more the better, chase after the carrot, feel passionate and then grow exhausted and rinse and repeat. It is compared to extravagant meals.

        My TED talk is on this concept, but unfortunately they only give me 8 minutes to speak. I will send the link to you when it gets on the web.

  • Leonard
    Reply

    You mentioned the disruption the industrial revolution created in western society. To get an idea of what is coming next I can recommend the book ‘The Second Machine Age’, by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

    The next 20-30 years are going to change the world in ways we can’t imagine, especially for work life integration, as Joel put it and to which I agree, it is more of an integration. That is not to say life can’t be compartmentalised when required, but as you pointed out the ultra-communication of today will push the boundries of this if people let it.

    Often the work you do will dictate the amount of integration required. Personally I have on-call and alot of after hours work so the job obviously is difficult to compartmentalise completely, therefore has to be integrated.

    Re new years resolutions, I think it would be close to a couple of decades now since I have played that silly game. If I want to do something, then when I am ready it is time to do it.

    Great podcast, with a few meaty bits to chew on and think over.

    • Joel Mark Witt
      Reply

      Thanks Leonard for the comments.

      As I think more about the integration of work/life for the future – I’m guessing that we will need to develop skill around clear boundaries.

      Because our lives are so connected – we will need to be more self-directed to what we allow into our sphere.

      Thanks for being apart of the conversation Leonard.

      • Leon
        Reply

        I would say that most people, including the types you suspect otherwise, prefer an integrated work-life thing going on. I think it is more like they can handle the current system more due to the functions, but the workday and school day as they are is unnatural to everyone. They prefer to put their functions to better use elsewhere.

        Si types might handle minutiae better, but that is because they have a sense of responsibility, which is part of their philosophy. They do not necessarily like it. I spoke to an ISFJ and he said he gets tired of data too like everyone else. To a certain extent handling “mundane” tasks actually is relaxing and meditative (as the Si types tend to be), and thus healthy, but the way work is set up it is too much, and is unhealthy for everyone. Si types actually love creative activities, such as photography, making crafts, etc…tons of examples. They would rather be using their detail-orientedness to handle that than factory-like work.

        On the surface Te types may seem to like a good block of work, but it is not hard to see they actually dislike the current work-a-day world as much as everyone else, and it is unhealthy for them. There are more positive environments to use their Te.

        Look into the Venus Project and Zeitgeist Movement–I think an INTJ imagined those. It is a future city with no monetary system that is sustainable. Very efficient city, as a Te person would like. The monetary system needs to be trashed…the world’s debt is 10 times its GDP, I believe. Yes some Te types may like to maximize profits, but if they are shown that the monetary system is actually inefficient, then they would dislike it and would be very good at finding a way out of the current system.

        • Leon
          Reply

          I might have seem off-topic, but what I meant to say was that the Venus Project, as well as Self-Determination theory, states that people are intrinsically motivated to do things, to challenge themselves, to invigorate themselves. Look back to when you were a child, this is how you felt about things, regardless of personality type.

          The premise of the monetary system is that people don’t do anything unless they are given money. The fact is we have all the resources to save the planet and all humanity now, but simply because everything costs money, no one will do this. The reason why people don’t do things unless they are given money is caused by the monetary system itself.

          If a child loves playing soccer, if you give the child a nickel for every goal, they would lose their intrinsic interest in soccer and associate it with the nickel. The kids (like businesses today) will only then focus on getting goals rather than the art of the game. We intrinsically want to solve the worlds problems using our own gifts, to give back to the community. We lost that because of money.

          We will do an activity we love. Then given a reward each time we do the activity, sure it may increase the activity. But take away the reward, activity falls below baseline. That is why people become sedentary. However, no one is naturally sedentary.

          Get rid of the monetary system and guarantee resources for all people everywhere…we have the means to do that. This is the future work-life world, or play-is-work, work-is-play world, play-is-life world.

          • Joel Mark Witt

            Great thoughts. I think the challenge is… how do you make the transition?

            People won’t give up a current system until they see a clear alternative that is better… or the pain of the one they are using becomes so great that they feel the need to switch.

            So how do we help people see abundance and a better way?

        • Leon
          Reply

          I might have seem off-topic, but what I meant to say was that the Venus Project, as well as Self-Determination theory, states that people are intrinsically motivated to do things, to challenge themselves, to invigorate themselves. Look back to when you were a child, this is how you felt about things, regardless of personality type.

          The premise of the monetary system is that people don’t do anything unless they are given money. The fact is we have all the resources to save the planet and all humanity now, but simply because everything costs money, no one will do this. The reason why people don’t do things unless they are given money is caused by the monetary system itself.

          If a child loves playing soccer, if you give the child a nickel for every goal, they would lose their intrinsic interest in soccer and associate it with the nickel. The kids (like businesses today) will only then focus on getting goals rather than the art of the game. We intrinsically want to solve the worlds problems using our own gifts, to give back to the community. We lost that because of money.

          We will do an activity we love. Then given a reward each time we do the activity, sure it may increase the activity. But take away the reward, activity falls below baseline. That is why people become sedentary. However, no one is naturally sedentary.

          Get rid of the monetary system and guarantee resources for all people everywhere…we have the means to do that. This is the future work-life world, or play-is-work, work-is-play world, play-is-life world.

  • Leon
    Reply

    I am writing about how right now in the form of artistically-composed short essays. Basically my essays in a nutshell: it comes down to realizing we are living in hierarchical relationships to one another, and basing our self-esteem on that. We live in a pyramid, those at the bottom feel inferior, and those at the top feel superior. However, neither side, even the top, experience wholeness or know what their potential is. This is because the pyramid is constructed, so people only exist in relation of their superiority or inferiority to someone else. They live in accordance to a formula for beauty, success, tastes, etc. However, everyone is unique, so living anywhere in the pyramid is a lie and gives no fulfillment. My approach is to show people intrapersonal fulfillment, because this attracts people since they are concerned about their own health. Then I suggest to have this, we must live interdependently, not hierarchically–this realization alone cleans the thoughts and makes them healthier. The hierarchical view may make you feel powerful, but that power is illusory, and even when it makes you feel powerful, there is an inner sickening or hollowing emptiness. By getting beyond hierarchy, the individual mind becomes healthier. So, how to change the current system? It takes time, it takes a multifaceted approach. As my interests is in psychology, I address one of these facets. I want to prepare others psychologically for the transition to a new system.

    • Joel Mark Witt
      Reply

      Sounds like you’ve been doing some serious thinking and writing on this topic. Thanks for sharing on here with us Leon.

  • Robert
    Reply

    Joel and Antonia, thank you for your discussion about healthy lifestyle structure in a 24/7 connected world, I needed to hear this! For me, much tighter limits on connectivity (internet etc) has greatly helped, redirecting energy and focus into those parts of my life that make the most difference in the long term. I begin and end each day with ‘Private Victories’ this builds deep capacity then I reach out with ‘Public Victories’ to enjoy deeper connection with my peers. This year my mantra is “Real Conversations” (not texts, not emails). What I heard from you two in this podcast is a “Real Conversation” beautiful example! Robert (Authenticity/Explorer)

    • Joel Mark Witt
      Reply

      Thanks Robert for sharing your perspective and the kind supportive words. Antonia and I both thrive on feedback and encouragement – so thank you.

  • Mark
    Reply

    I personally don’t do the new years resolution thing and probably never have. I like to keep life simple and try to prioritize my time around the people in my life.

    Great podcast and thanks.

Leave a Comment