How Cognitive Functions
fit in the Car Model

personality-hacker_car-model-cognitive-stack

Cognitive Function “Stack” of Each Type

PowerPoint Presentation

 

 Cognitive Functions Overview

PowerPoint Presentation

 

Showing 14 comments
  • Amartya
    Reply

    Great guides!!! In the Cognitive Function “Stack” of Each Type it seems two types are missing- ISFP and ESTJ. Would it be possible to add them to the table too. Thanks!

    • Antonia Dodge
      Reply

      You’re right! I’m not sure how they got cut off. I’ll add them. 🙂

      -A-

      edit: Fixed!

  • Amartya
    Reply

    Thanks!!!

  • Sarah
    Reply

    This is awesome, by the way!

    I love how you simply laid out dominant/tertiary, etc. also seeing your terms for “Intoverted Intuition” etc. is so helpful!

    Could you delineate how/when the 3 year old and 10 year old come into play? I know you spoke about it on the video…

    • Sarah
      Reply

      OOPS!! I found your graphic! Never mind 🙂

  • Sarah Faira
    Reply

    I am a bit of a “noob” to the MBTI system, but am quickly learning what it is all about. When I took a personality assessment just for fun, I found this system to be the most accurate and enlightening personality test I had ever taken. It pegged me so well, I instantly wanted to learn all I could about how this test works inside and out. I am now a fan of this site, because it allows me to engage in helpful self introspection and also investigate and learn about all the other types as well to make my life more effective, not only for myself, but others around me. BTW, I am an INTJ, and can finally realize and understand why I think and behave in the way I do and be at peace with it:) I am insatiably curious when it comes to knowledge and have found a new topic to investigate exhaustively. This should keep me busy for a while anyway;)

  • Melissa
    Reply

    I think the 3 yr old, as blind spot, is hard to identify with so that is why it can be confusing at times you are right. When I look at my 3 yr old the difficulty is the INTJ and INFJ have the same 3 yr old and I did come up in one test that shows functions as having 0 ES, a few years ago. I think I’d test a bit different now as have been doing a lot of mindfulness and acceptance work, which would develop SE. And when I look at Introverted sensing it is so much more what I can relate to than extroverted sensing. Yet when I think about IN and IT/IF as part of INFJ/INTJ it could operate in the same ways as IS so that might be why, both I miss the SE as am compensating by using the IN and IT/IF instead of S … yet it does not help identify which is which as much as the EF and ET descriptions do.

    • Charis Branson
      Reply

      Melissa – You mentioned you resonate more strongly with Si (introverted sensing).

      Do you find yourself having to fight landing in a ‘comfort zone’ in your life and not pushing yourself?

  • Matt
    Reply

    What if we feel we relate most to functions not in any of the mentioned groupings? Ie extraverted intuition, introverted intuition, introverted feeling, extraverted thinking than extraverted sensing? Maybe I’m misunderstanding their meanings since there aren’t examples given like when you walk into a bakery you experience this, notice this first etc. and it leaves my mind to wander. Description wise I feel like ENFP but function wise it’s E/INTJ, some very different types!

    Any insights you have would be so appreciated :)!

  • Frances
    Reply

    I have a question. How do the four functions that are not in our “car” affect us? I am an INFP and am generally not aware of my surroundings — run into the edges of things a lot, don’t notice when someone wears the same shirt every day, no particular draw toward background noise/music… I thought I read somewhere that this is common in INFP’s because Extroverted Sensing is so very far off of our radars. Curious if you have developed any materials about how the remaining functions affect our lives.

    • Antonia Dodge
      Reply

      There are theories that indicate the four ‘shadow functions’ impact us in predictable ways. For example, John Beebe’s 8 function model. While I love the elegance of his model (I’m a sucker for an elegant model), my observations haven’t yet fully aligned with it. That’s one of the reasons we don’t teach it, actually.

      My observations have been that the four shadow functions impact people in different ways, and in particular based on the heaviest influences in their lives.

      For example, I grew up in a heavily Accuracy/Harmony (Introverted Thinking/Extraverted Harmony) influenced household. Only my brother used something other than Accuracy or Harmony. As an ENTJ he used Effectiveness (Extraverted Thinking). There was almost no Authenticity (Introverted Feeling) represented, since it only really showed up as my brother’s 3 Yr Old process. (Obviously we were all using it as it’s a basic function of the mind, but it wasn’t ‘in our car’ so to speak). I’ve struggled my entire life to be in touch with my own emotional processes. They were never really honored in my family for any of us and so it just wasn’t on anyone’s radar. I have a friend who is an ENTP and it’s very different for her. She grew up in an environment that was always ‘checking in’ with emotions. Her Achilles Heel is Effectiveness – it’s difficult for her to see in terms of running systems or managing other people.

      One anecdote doesn’t a theory make, but I’m using it an example of how our influences in life may impact our relationship with our shadow processes.

      Typing family members and/or the biggest influences in your life as well circumstances and situations you may have been thrown into (and thus forced to develop certain functions for self-preservation) may help you understand your relationship with your shadow processes.

      Definitely check out Beebe’s work, though. Cause I could be totally wrong and he could be totally right. 😛

      -A-

  • Frances
    Reply

    Just remembered to check back for your reply. Thank you for taking the time to provide so much food for thought.

    It is an interesting thought to look at our personalities in the context of our families/close social groups. I can definitely see strengths (and weaknesses) in how I “use” my personality that are direct reflections of my immediate family’s culture and values.

    I’ll look into Beebe’s work — if nothing else it will be something interesting to think about.

    Frances

  • Jesse
    Reply

    Hey, I’m not sure if you mentioned this elsewhere on the site, but why do some types lead with Feeling/Thinking while it seems that most other types lead with the Intuition/Sensing?

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