Generational Theory and Archetypes (Part 2) | Podcast 0467

Download Episode Here right click link and select “Save Link As…”

In this episode of the Personality Hacker podcast, Joel and Antonia continue their conversation about Strauss and Howe’s work on Generational Theory and how it might help us understand current world conditions.

————————————————

In this podcast you’ll find:

  • Get the foundation of generational theory by listening to our previous podcast, Generational Theory and Archetypes (Part 1).
  • Discover which generation you are in: the official dates for each generation.
    • Find the full list of dates for all generations on wikipedia.
  • What are the 4 generational archetypes?
  • What is the generational archetypal energy of the Boomers?
    • How does each of the 4 seasons of generational theory show up for the Boomer’s generational archetype?
    • What are some main concerns and issues that are showing up for Boomers in the current season?
  • What generation is approximately born during the season of “Summer” in generational theory?
    • Why are they often considered to be the neglected generation?
    • How does this generational archetype usually approach the world?
    • How does each of the 4 seasons of generational theory show up for this generational archetype?
    • Why is there generally a harshness around this generational archetype?
  • When is the generational archetype energy known as the “hero” born?
    • Why is this generational archetype energy called the hero?
    • How does each of the 4 seasons of generational theory show up for the hero generational archetype?
    • What is one of the main issues that this generation is dealing with right now?
    • What kind of energy does this generation bring?
  • What is the last generational archetype energy?
    • How is this generation treated and what are some expectations for this generational archetype?
    • Why are they called “artists”?
    • How does each of the 4 seasons of generational theory show up for this generational archetype?
    • Which areas do they usually become influential in?
  • Why all the generational archetypal energies are important
  • What is happening right now in regards to the generational archetypal energies?

 

To subscribe to the podcast, please use the links below:

Subscribe with iTunes
Non-iTunes Link
Soundcloud
Stitcher
Google Play
Spotify
Radio Public
PlayerFM
Listen Notes

If you like the podcast and want to help us out in return, please leave an honest rating and review on iTunes by clicking here. It will help the show and its ranking in iTunes immensely! We would be eternally grateful!

Want to learn more?

Discover Your Personal Genius

free-personality-test-myers-briggs-2

We want to hear from you. Leave your comments below…

Recent Posts
Showing 18 comments
  • Teish
    Reply

    I’m a late Gen X—born in 1980–and I listened to Parts 1 & 2 just today. I had to smile at one point because I had a conversation yesterday where it was said, “Why are people so sensitive and just get offended over everything now?” I think our generation was showing! LOL!

    My perspective on my childhood is that I had to “grow up fast” and figure things out on my own because it’s just what I had to do. As a mom, I’ve noticed that I’m not comfortable letting my kids take on some things that I did at their age. My thought is that this may be a generational thing. I’ll have to ponder that a bit.

    My kids are the Artist generation—my oldest will turn 18 next month. It’s interesting that I’m from a more independent generation, and so are my kids. It does tend to explain the very independent streak we all have in our house!

    The part where you mentioned kids in my generation missing out on a “normal childhood” resonated with me. That’s one thing that I’ve felt so bad about over the last 2-2 1/2 years—that my kids have missed out on so much, and that I don’t know when things will be back to “normal” for them. Though, I guess if we take generational theory into account, what I consider “normal” isn’t really coming back anytime soon.

    Fascinating stuff! I’ll have to ponder it more. Do you recommend a particular book as the starting point for reading more?

    • Antonia Dodge
      Reply

      The best book to start with is “The Fourth Turning” by Neil Howe and William Strauss. Thanks for listening!

      -A-

  • Kacy
    Reply

    My favorite part of the Strauss-Howe generational theory that you skated around was the cyclical rise and fall of institutionalism vs individualism. Spring is the growth of new institutions, Summer is the height of institutional strength, Autumn is the growth of individualism and the unraveling of institutions, and Winter is the height of individualistic strength. This fits with the insight you had a year or so ago in a podcast that we are in a “perceiving” zeitgeist right now, and our systems are unraveling which could be unsettling for Judgers. By this observation and my own experience, I’d disagree with your claim in this podcast that we’re at a strong collectivist mindset right now – if everyone is hunkering down and not sharing, if everyone is putting their faith in singular figures (social media stars, the deification of political leaders) rather than the institutions themselves, if we are being led by the Nomad generation in power, that is the very definition of individualism in power over a collectivist mindset.

    To that end, the Hero generation is not just a generation creating battles to fight. The Heros are a generation that remembers the bounty of their childhood that strong institutions can reap, but are thrust into adulthood as individualism is at it’s peak. As young adults, their role as the hero might be a “battle,” physical or cultural, but more likely than not they are simply the heroes keeping the world spinning throughout crises caused by a lack of institutions suitable for their point in time (suitability in part but not always defined by the values laid down by the prophets). Their bitter experience with individualism then creates a strong bent towards collectivist action as a solution, which is why in midlife they tend be the ones leading the effort of rebuilding institutions.

    Didn’t mean to turn this into a defense of the Hero generation, but your dislike of Millennials was extremely palpable in this episode lol.

    • Antonia Dodge
      Reply

      To clarify, it is a burgeoning sense of collectivism in the air right now, as it feels like everyone is playing “Hungry, Hungry Hippo” to plant the flag of what that collectivism will look like in the next saeculum, specifically ‘Spring’. I suspect we would simply call it ‘the culture war’.

      While I’ve learned that no amount of careful wording or positive intent in a podcast can avoid people finding offense, I think it’s important to make it clear I have no dislike of any generation and am always made optimistic when I experience people who show up as good representatives. As mentioned multiple times in the podcast, all of the archetypal energies are needed.

      -A-

  • Catlyn
    Reply

    I’d be curious to hear further distinctions between the Prophet archetype’s brand of navel gazing during an Awakening vs. the current Millennial generation’s navel gazing. I’m an older Millennial and “navel-gazers” is a pejorative I’ve heard levied at my generation more than once. Is there any difference to them?

    • Antonia Dodge
      Reply

      Hi, Catlyn! Good to hear from you. 🙂

      I haven’t run into Millennials (Heroes) being called ‘navel gazers’, nor have I personally ever considered it. I find Millennials to be far more action-oriented than Boomers (Prophets).

      -A-

  • M
    Reply

    Millenial ISFP here.
    It would be interesting to see how each of the 16 types act in each generational archetype as well. Like how would an ISFP Gen Z differ from an ISFP in Gen X for example? Or an ISTJ or ENFJ etc. How each generation plays out in each generation would be interesting in it of itself.

    I also wanted to comment on something Joel said, about how all these super hero and Marvel-type movies were coming into popularity during the coming of age of Millenials. I did some research out of curiosity, and I think a similar occurrence happened with the previous “hero” generation. According to an article I read on Wikipedia, the “Golden age of comic books” started around 1938 which was approximately when the last crisis era would have been taking place (and please correct me if I have the timeline wrong). So therefore the “Hero” generation at the time was getting some similar messages in pop culture at the time as Millenials do today. I think that’s very fascinating!

    • M
      Reply

      I just realized my typo from the first paragraph. I meant to say it would be interesting to see how each personality type plays out in each generation.

    • Antonia Dodge
      Reply

      I saw another comment here discussing the connection with super hero comic books of last century. I also think it’s fascinating! Thanks for mentioning it.

      -A-

  • BK Jackson
    Reply

    Interesting. I need to listen to part 1-2 again to take in more detail. I haven’t spent much time studying generational labels. I heard about “boomers” several decades ago and belatedly found out I was labeled an “X”. The only thing I got out of an X is I always felt ignored generationally, as the only 2 generations that garner mention are the boomers and the millenials (I tend to find millenials have an arrogant streak–not all, of course, but some). And quite frankly, this podcast was helpful in giving me some idea of what others perceive label X people to be because people throw around the terms but seldom explain the meaning and traits behind the labels. My only knowledge definition for boomers was post WWII babies. Not helpful in understanding the distinctions.

    So thanks for shedding light on this subject. I look forward to listening again for further clarity.

    • Antonia Dodge
      Reply

      Yeah, I’m not a big fan of how generations are talked about outside of this model. The titles feel more like reasons to accuse younger/older folk of things in media than a desire to truly understanding. Thanks for commenting. 🙂

      -A-

  • Jay
    Reply

    This GenXer thinks this is an even better follow up to part 1. Want to find a way to include this in class. I was actually raised in a nurturing, supportive almost Leave It To Beaver home (more coddled than latchkey here) but definitely relate to the Zeitgeist idea. The pragmatic whatever works idea makes so much sense to me. Think of all the pop culture references we got growing up about making things work: “Do…or do not…there is no try,””Just do it,””git ‘er done,” “make it so,” etc. etc. Of course, towards that, we were sorta taught to swim by being thrown off the proverbial dock. In school, from grade school to grad school, a research project was “here is the project. Go. Do. Figure it out. Come back when you are done.” My Gen Y and Gen Z students short circuit with that…they want to be told not just what do do but how to do it, and will come back with an idea to make sure it is okay. Then they will do that..exactly what I told them..and often nary a micron more. When I say “well, this is great but you could have developed a or b,” they say, “why didn’t you tell me to do that?”

    As a department chair, it is funny how almost all my fellow chairs and lower administrators are Gen X and so many of us found ourselves pushed into the role. I joke that a Gen X power struggle is a group of people all scrambling to not be in charge and the loser ends up being the leader. A related issue, though, is that Boomers, once they were in charge, proceeded to hold onto leadership for literally decades so there was no gentle sheltering of future leaders. Often, it was a boomer who had been there for a long time and when they decided to step down or retire, it was like “now what do we do?” I have long said that Boomers are like mighty, majestic oaks whos canopy limited the rain and light that made it to the forest floor so when those oaks finally fall, all that remain are seedlings.

    So much to think about.

    • Jay
      Reply

      To follow up..again so much to think about..You are spot on with not everyone fitting a model. There are definitely Gen Y and Z go getters who do amazingly creative and capable self-starters(following up on my earlier post) and stand out in part because, well, they stand out. There are Gen Xers who were raised the youngest sibling of a family of Boomers and so behave more like Boomers. There are definitely splits in the older and younger Boomer set..eg the Generation Jones moniker for the younger Boomers. Ironically, the Greatest Generation did not think of themselves this way…that was a Boomer name for them. In fact, they were raised by folks who came of age in the 1930s and 1940s who were not at all sure these younger kids really “got it” and were just interested in partying to the latest swing band (eg David Riesmann’s Lonely Crowd). There are Silents who were raised by grandparents in the Depression rather than their parents.

    • Antonia Dodge
      Reply

      I agree that how we’re treated in school has a big influence on us as well as at home. I hadn’t really considered how little guidance we had as X’ers when we were given projects and that we still had to figure it out, which would definitely send a message on how ‘can do’ we all had to be. Thanks for the comment!

      -A-

  • Dan
    Reply

    Congratulations! That was a good presentation on the theory. This Xer has been studying it for a long time, and I think you guys have pretty much all the basics down. I really appreciated when Antonia emphasized that each archetype and generation has a part to play, each is necessary. Off the top of my head there are a couple of things I want to add. One is not to write the Boomers off just yet. There’s likely almost a decade left in this Crisis and I have a feeling they still have a big contribution left to make. The other thing has to do with superhero movies. As Joel pointed out they’ve been big this Crisis. Well guess what? In yet another example of history rhyming, where this Crisis might be the Golden Age of superhero movies, the previous Crisis is also known as the Golden Age of the superhero comic book. That was when the genre came into being.

    • Antonia Dodge
      Reply

      I agree – Boomers will still have contribution, and I think we’ll see more and more of older generations influencing saeculums in unusual ways as our life span increases. Thanks for the comment!

      -A-

  • Jess
    Reply

    This was helpful in understanding why I never felt like I fit the archetypical energy of the millennial’s around me. I spent three formative years of my childhood in Israel during the gulf war. I definitely got the “be compliant because the stakes are too high” messaging and resonate with the artist generation energy. Telling my children to mask up during COVID gave me a kind of dejavu to the gas masks of my childhood. My younger sister who has no memories of our time in Israel has the true millennial energy.

    • Antonia Dodge
      Reply

      Also, I believe I heard (or read) somewhere that Europe is on a different saeculum cycle than the U.S. For example, WWI may have been the culmination of their ‘Winter’. If other countries/continents are experiencing different generational archetypes would be different from the U.S. at the same time in history, it may influence people who lived other places when young.

      -A-

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Contact Us

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Not readable? Change text. captcha txt